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Why reading information about investing is like meeting people at a party

We have just been doing some ‘consumer testing’ with people who have managed funds.  As ever, when you use a technique like this you learn more and more about how to do it well.  This time it occurred to me that people react to information in almost the same way that they interact with people.

We use a hybrid method where we first collect data, and then conduct a qualitative interview so we are able to measure reactions but also gain qualitative insight.

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Forget focus groups for testing written communications. Here's what to do instead

It has never been so important for brands to write clearly and effectively to their customers, yet the techniques most research agencies use to test written communications have not kept up with the times.

Many clients still use focus groups, because that is how they have always tested advertising. 

I love focus groups, but here are three reasons why we need to test written communications such as brochures, websites and correspondence individually, not in groups.

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Three tips for testing disclosure, labels and claims

One of the things we like to do most is to help organisations communicate clearlySo we do a lot of testing of organisational communications of various kinds such as disclosure documents, fact sheets, labels and the like. We always advise our clients that 'understanding' involves more than just understanding the words.  This paper on nutrition claims supports our view. Based on our insights and supported by the evidence in the study described in the paper, here are three tips for testing labels, fact sheets and claims.

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What cookbooks and magazines can tell us about Christmas in Australia

I have been looking at cookbooks and magazines which feature Christmas recipes.  All were published in 2018.  I have come to the conclusion that Christmas as a cultural (rather than religious) festival in Australia has become very muddled. In research terms, I could say that the ‘narrative is incoherent’, but I think I will stick with muddled.

How can cookbooks and magazines tell us anything about Christmas?

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